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Rain chances dwindling, tropical update

Posted: 8:18 AM, Jul 09, 2018
Updated: 2018-07-09 09:18:05-04
[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U7-C-JTyecU?rel=0&showinfo=0]

After a rather wet and showery weather pattern for the last several days, we’re finally going to see a break in the rain. This second week of July looks to be a bit drier, and as a result, a little bit warmer too.

Monday’s forecast

Monday will be the last day with an even halfway decent chance of rain. Isolated showers are forecast to form during the early afternoon, before moving inland by dinnertime. We should clear up in time for a beautiful evening.

High temperatures will be in the upper 80s in Corpus Christi and lower 90s for inland spots. But as we kiss the rain goodbye, we’ll be welcoming a return of some warmer temperatures by mid-week.

Tuesday and Wednesday

We will still have some moisture in the air, which could allow the sea breeze to spark one or two tiny showers. However, we should expect to stay dry since these showers would be extremely small and brief. 

The temperatures will already start climbing, with highs in the low 90s for Corpus Christi and a few degrees warmer inland. We’ll keep the partly cloudy skies around, but those skies should become mostly sunny as dry air filters in for the end of the week.

End of the week

Mostly sunny skies, warmer temperatures, and no rain—we’ll be back to a more typical summer weather pattern as we round out the week.

Tropical update

We talked about Hurricane Beryl for much of last week, but over the weekend, it made an anticipated encounter with high wind shear. As expected, the storm fell apart quickly once that happened, and it is now just a remnant area of showers and storms. However, the National Hurricane Center is still monitoring the area for redevelopment of the storm as it brings rain to the Caribbean islands.

Meanwhile, Chris has formed off the coast of the Carolinas. It is expected to stay offshore and head northeastward toward the Canadian Maritime Provinces. Increased swells and rip currents will be the primary threats along the East Coast.