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Residents in Southern California town dealing with no water and looters after earthquakes

Posted: 2:44 PM, Jul 08, 2019
Updated: 2019-07-15 15:28:27-04
Residents in Southern California town dealing with no water and looters after earthquakes

There have been thousands of aftershocks after two strong earthquakes hit northeast of Los Angeles.

Communities are shaken after the two earthquakes—measuring at 6.4 and 7.1 magnitudes--hit in less than two days. The July 5 earthquake was the strongest in Southern California in 20 years.

Many people living in Trona, California say they don't want to stick around to see the next one.

“I know this is God's work and all, but it’s traumatizing,” says Dorothea Mith.

Smith says she no longer feels safe living in this section of Southern California, and she plans on moving.

“All this is broken apart,” Smith says, as she looks at the damage to her home. “It fell. My glasses started falling and I just couldn't move.”

Smith says all she was thinking about during the earthquakes was about staying alive.

“I just don't feel safe her anymore,” she says. “The wall is breaking, and I once loved this house. Loved it.”

Smith says her community is without water.

“It’s nasty. We can’t use the restroom; we can’t shower,” she says.

The feeling of vulnerability seems to be spreading across the desert.

Construction workers say they’ve fixed multiple water main breaks in just the past few days.

Meanwhile, at the town’s high school, volunteers and the Army are handing out free water and meals to residents.

Resident Steve Rosenow says not only is his community dealing with no water and a fractured foundation, they have to deal with looters, too.

“It’s pretty frustrating,” Rosenow says. “We got to protect what's ours, but you don't want to hurt anybody.”